Chemical Safety Crosses The Global Chemical Safety Frontier

Environmental best practices and corporate stewardship are, not surprisingly, important globally. Building upon the education of environmental awareness, bettering safety regulations and business practices for the handling of hazardous materials, and the general proactive habits of creating a safer workplace, community, and a cleaner earth are not only trending topics but are shaping the paths of governments and businesses alike. In aligning Chemical Safety’s objectives to provide an Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) software solution to the relevant industries of the aforementioned matters, the Environmental Management Systems (EMS) software is growing to meet the global chemical safety landscape.

The GHS and SDS labeling and Safety Data Sheet initiative has already been implemented in over 70 countries around the world and has helped bridge the gap of confusing, conflicting and incomplete information.  EMS offers a vast global GHS and SDS repository for free at http://chemicalsafety.com/sds-search.

Chemical Safety is working on initiatives for incorporating international regulatory compliance in order to accommodate client environmental management needs globally. For thirty years, the EMS software, a comprehensive and complete EH&S suite covering tracking of the entire chemical lifecycle, has served the US federal, regional and local chemical management regulatory requirements. Now, EMS is undergoing metamorphic changes to be able to handle and incorporate the regulatory and tracking requirements that make it a Globally Compliant Technology.

Taking EMS to a universal level involves understanding and incorporating the regional regulatory needs of clients, new important features and localization and language capabilities. Agencies like The European Chemical Agency (ECHA), the European Commission, The European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA), and their regulations such as REACH (The European Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and restriction of Chemicals), CLP, the European Classification, Labelling and Packaging of Chemicals, China REACH (MEP Order 7) and others are some of the considerations that dictate how to improve the global capabilities of EMS. Similarly, expansion efforts to certain EMEA and APAC countries help broaden the horizon in how to build the robustness of EMS.

Working to make EMS globally compliant and to include the right tools and information for EH&S management does not come only by working to meet regional requirements. As Chemical Safety expands into a global frontier, needs to meet the growing and more advanced industries is a parallel effort.  Chemical Safety already serves the educational, government, defense, private R&D, manufacturing and producing, and aerospace industries in the United States. Building the EMS software to meet customer needs from innovative and vanguard industries such as these on a global scale is a part of the challenging but rewarding work.

As new ventures and opportunities arise to grow, learn, and teach, Chemical Safety strives to be an integral cog in the development of industries that will ultimately improve workplace safety and our overall quality of life. This is Chemical Safety’s way of being a positive part of a globally collective effort. For more information on Chemical Safety’s initiatives, please visit or contact us at www.chemicalsafety.com.

By Paul Scott Mitsis, Chemical Safety Software